Newchurch Roads

The roads serving Newchurch from New Romney, Hythe, Ivychurch and Bilsington have existed from before the 17th century. By the first half of the 20th century these roads were mostly covered in beach shingle, which was readily available locally.  With the advent of heavier farm machinery and faster transport, the roads were gradually upgraded to their present state.

Denne's Lorry c.1930

Denne & Sons Lorry transporting a steam engine, c.1930.

Up until 1920, there was a bus, drawn by two horses, twice a week on market day, from New Romney to Ashford. After 1920 there was a motor-bus, but very few cars or bicycles. Most transport would be horse drawn. Sheep would be driven to Ashford market; a notice at the side of the road read ‘a drove passes here every Monday morning at a certain time for Ashford market. Lodge at Kingsnorth’. The drove would start off with just a few sheep and would finish up with large numbers as it approached Ashford

A cycle, with Lance Beeching in the attached sidecar about 1948

 
Ivy Homewood c.1935

Ivy Homewood poses by a visiting car c.1935.

At the end of 1873, the total cost of maintaining the 14 miles of the roads of Newchurch was £299, 5 shillings and five pence ha’penny.

This was made up as follows

 

s

d

 manual labour

82

7

 team labour

1

7

6

 materials

192

9

9

 tradesmen’s bills

6

1

4

 salaries

16

10

7

 other payments

9

 

 

and was 14 shillings and sixpence ha’penny under the budget of £300

 
 

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